The Cheshire Land Trust Governing Board meets the third Thursday of each month at the Cheshire Chamber of Commerce office located at 195 S Main St. #2, Cheshire, CT 06410. If you would like to attend, contact us.

Cheshire Land Trust, P.O.Box 781, Cheshire, CT 06410

CLT is an all-volunteer, private 501(c) 3 non-profit organization committed to conservation. We are not affiliated with the town of Cheshire. We do not receive taxpayer monies. Our organization is wholly funded by our membership.

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CONTACT US >

Phone: 203-806-0258

CheshireLandTrust@gmail.com

Old Farms Preserve

Property Name:

Old Farms Preserve

Donor:

Barbara Consolo, James Krieg & Robert Roth

1998

Acquisition Date:

Acreage:

6.3

Location:

Old Farms Road

Habitat:

Wildlife & Bird Sanctuary. Open space meadow on traprock uplift.

Park on Old Farms Road by the CLT sign. Adjacent to town owned 185-acre DeDominicis preserve.

The Old Farms Preserve was donated to the Cheshire Land Trust by three adjacent landowners on Old Farms Road that wished to see the land preserved rather than developed as housing.  They purchased three undeveloped subdivision lots totaling six acres, and gave the land to CLT in December 1998.

Located in the far southeast corner of Cheshire, Old Farms Preserve is just north of the Old Lane Road / Old Farms Road intersection.  The preserve is bordered to the north and south by residential properties, to the east by Old Farms Road, and to the west by the Town of Cheshire's large (200+/- acre) Dedominicis Property.

A mixture of woods and meadow-like conditions cover the property. The forested areas contains relatively young and small trees. There are also a few small wet patches.  The western portion of the preserve slopes down sharply towards the Dedominicis Property, 

Running though the center of the preserve is a large powerline. Eversource Energy's transmission line maintenance program periodically performs tree and shrub cutting to make sure the vegetation does not interfere with the powerlines.This also has the effect of maintaining the area as shrub and meadow habitat.  Having this and other small open areas right next to large preserved forested areas is particularly beneficial to many wildlife species such as raptors.  The "interface" between the two areas is called "edge habitat".  If three different habitat types come together, the intersection point is called a "covert". Coverts are considered quite valuable for a wide range of wildlife diversity.